The Philosophical Apprentice

“Only one who devotes himself to a cause with his whole strength and soul can be a true master. For this reason mastery demands all of a person.” Albert Einstein

Productivity and Philosophy

For a blog that ostensibly exists to cover the travails of a middle aged man attempting to arrive at a working knowledge of the western philosophical tradition, I write about a lot about productivity and time management.

In my opinion, learning about time management  is a lot like learning logic in philosophy. Just as it is really hard to do philosophy without a solid grounding in logic so it is difficult to do philosophy whatsoever if you do not have the time to invest in it.

What I strive to do with all the time management skills I’ve picked up over the years is to free up the time to read and write philosophy. It is a critical skill set for me since I’m married with kids and working a full time job.

I know from past experience that if I do not set aside at least 10-15 hours a week then my studies suffer and I have to struggle in the back end to get up caught up. Getting caught up usually means a lot of late-nighters which I’m really trying to avoid.

An make no mistake, philosophy is a difficult subject to learn. As the London Philosophy Study Guide expresses it

At no stage in one’s career is reading philosophy easy. Some people claim to read philosophy for pleasure. Wittgenstein is reported to have said that he found reading some philosophy ‘a kind of agony’. Many people are inclined to agree with this. Whatever good intentions philosophers have to make their works clear, accessible, and fun to read, the result is rarely any better than more dull and dense prose with a few corny jokes. Remember that you read philosophy not for the pleasure of the moment, but for what you can come away with.

It is important, then, that you make your reading of philosophy as efficient and rewarding as possible.

 

Advertisements

Single Post Navigation

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: